Photo of Jonathan H. Ferry

Jon Ferry brings his substantial experience as a federal prosecutor to assisting clients in False Claims Act litigation, government investigations and other enforcement actions, internal risk analysis and internal investigations.

Jon served as Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina for over seven years. As the head of the Affirmative Civil Enforcement (ACE) program and the Healthcare Fraud Coordinator for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Jon led and supervised numerous investigations in the areas of healthcare, financial services and other complex frauds. He has significant experience with the False Claims Act and other whistleblower actions, healthcare regulations (including the Anti-Kickback Statute and Stark Law), the Food Drugs and Cosmetics Act, and the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act (FIRREA).

As Medicare Advantage attracts more eligible beneficiaries, it is also drawing attention from False Claims Act (FCA) prosecutors. In 2022, enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans reached 28.7 million Medicare beneficiaries, or 49% of eligible beneficiaries. Recently, the United States intervened in a qui tam case against Cigna filed in the Southern District of New York and

With some estimates as high as $80 billion, fraud within the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has been described as the worst in a generation. The government has taken note with aggressive enforcement strategies across the country. Starting with what can be described as low-hanging fruit, the government’s enforcement efforts have expanded and

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Ruan v. United States ups the ante for prosecutors who bring charges against doctors for unlawfully dispensing and distributing drugs under the Controlled Substances Act. Under the Supreme Court’s guidance, to secure a conviction, the government must now prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, that doctors knowingly and intentionally exceeded