As we near the Thanksgiving holiday, we wanted to take a moment to thank you — our readers. Eye on Enforcement has been a fun project for the Bradley’s Government Enforcement and Investigations team. But the ultimate goal of any blog is to be read, and we’re grateful to have so many devoted readers. And

The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) in-house enforcement proceedings violate the Constitution, teeing up a decision that could curtail securities law enforcement and broadly undermine the power of the entire administrative state.

The Supreme Court agreed last month to review a Fifth Circuit ruling that struck down the

Last week, the Sixth Circuit and Supreme Court issued opinions on criminal law that could affect trial and sentencing strategy for white collar defendants in regulated industries.

District court discretion does not override the need for “the perception of fair sentencing” in the Sixth Circuit.

On June 22, 2023, the Sixth Circuit issued an opinion

On June 16, 2023, the Supreme Court in United States ex rel. Polanksy v. Executive Health Resources, affirmed the Third Circuit’s deferential standard regarding the government’s ability to dismiss False Claims Act (FCA) whistleblower cases being litigated by qui tam relators.  Notwithstanding this deferential standard, the Court rejected the government’s position that it has

On June 1, 2023, in U.S. ex rel. Schutte v. SuperValu Inc., the Supreme Court clarified the state-of-mind (or “scienter”) standard under the False Claims Act (FCA), holding that a defendant’s subjective belief that a claim was false was sufficient to establish the FCA’s scienter element. In doing so, the Court rejected the Seventh

In an extremely consequential decision issued last week, the United States Supreme Court reined in what the Court termed the government’s “boundless interpretation” of the aggravated identity theft statute, 18 U.S.C. § 1028A. Section 1028A provides for a mandatory two-year prison sentence for “any person who, during and in relation to any predicate offense knowingly

Recently, the Supreme Court of the United States tossed the convictions of two defendants found guilty of public corruption charges during former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s term. The opinions, Ciminelli v. United States and Percoco v. United States, continue the Court’s recent trend of narrowing the government’s ability to prosecute defendants under outlier

Recently, the Supreme Court of the United States tossed the convictions of two defendants found guilty of public corruption charges during former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s term. The opinions, Ciminelli v. United States and Percoco v. United States, continue the Court’s recent trend of narrowing the government’s ability to prosecute defendants under outlier

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) recently criticized “activist judges” for rewriting the text of the False Claims Act to achieve their own policy goals, revealing plans to reintroduce legislation that would correct “unduly restrictive” interpretations of the statute and expand liability for defendants.

Grassley — who delivered his remarks in a pre-recorded keynote speech at the

On December 6, 2022, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in United States ex rel. Polansky v. Executive Health Resources, Inc. As previously reported, this case raises whether the government has the authority to dismiss a False Claims Act (FCA) qui tam suit after it initially declined to proceed with its own action and